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The Life of Emma Willard John Lord

The Life of Emma Willard

John Lord

Published April 8th 2010
ISBN : 9781429043519
Paperback
366 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1873 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XIII.MoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1873 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XIII. 1854-1860.--Second Visit To Europe, And Literary LABOES. Mrs. *wtllard, like most people who have visited Europe, had a strong desire to revisit scenes of so much interest. She particularly desired to attend the Worlds Educational Convention, which was to be held in London during the summer of 1854. Still, the desired visit was attended with great difficulties. She was sixtynine years of age, and she could not go alone. Her son was preoccupied with the engrossing duties of the seminary. She must have a companion. So she selected her niece, Jane Lincoln, who had lived with her a considerable part of her life, whom she had educated, and to whom she was devotedly attached. But Mrs. Phelps was naturally unwilling to part with her daughter. After great importunities, the consent of Mrs. Phelps was finally obtained, and Mrs. Willard, accompanied by her niece, sailed in the Pacific, Captain Nye, June 24th, for Liverpool. She arrived, without any thing particularly interesting to chronicle, on July 6th, and proceeded at once to London, where she was warmly welcomed by Mr. Barnard, and was by him introduced to many who were eminent in the cause of education, and attended, with him, their most interesting meetings. She brought with her her own educational works, which she distributed to distinguished men. Unfortunately, I find no letters written by her during this visit to her numerous friends. From her diary, it would seem that she was well received by Mr. Buchanan, minister to London, and by many men of rank, including Sir John Herschel. She visited, once again, the various objects of interest in London, not surpassed, on the whole, I think, by those of any city in the world, but which are strangely neglected by American...